Zitate

Having left in 1985, Jobs returned to Apple in 1997 and unleashed his corporate son, Ive. Apple's software was in a mess and its market share almost invisible. So Jobs went for taste, and Ive produced a series of extraordinary, wildly postmodern machines. With their translucent, candy-coloured plastics and, in the case of the desktops, large, inviting handles, they had an almost overpowering tactile quality.

Bryan Appleyard, Sunday Times

  • iBook Girls
  • iBook Keylime 1
  • iBook Barbie
  • iBook Logicboard
  • iBook KeyLime 2
  • iBook Tangerine
  • iBook Hinges
  • iBook iMac to go

Mark Wilson, salon.com

But Apple’s color pendulum eventually swung back, and Apple trended toward less ostentatious products, both in hardware and software. “Steve always wanted to stay one step ahead. When the industry started to become very colorful and lickable, then he realized––and Jony and I realized––that we needed to take a different path,” recalls Don Lindsay, Apple’s former design director of the Mac OS user–experience group.

Mark Wilson, salon.com

Marina Go, womensagenda.com.au

Years ago when Carrie was writing her column through the night in her tiny New York apartment overflowing with shoes she couldn't possible have bought on her salary, I got a bit excited about the laptop she was using. Apple had released a handbag-shaped 'Clamshell' iBook G3 and Carrie had one. Graeme tracked one down for me. It no longer works but I can never throw it out. Irrational? Absolutely.

Marina Go, womensagenda.com.au

Tom Thompson, Computerworld.com

Apple Computer Inc. touts the iBook, its new consumer-class Macintosh notebook computer, as an "iMac to go." It certainly looks the part: Its clamshell case sports colored panels in either a bright peacock blue ("blueberry") or an incandescent orange ("tangerine"). The computer has interesting curves and angles that make it resemble an experimental hypersonic airfoil.

Tom Thompson, Computerworld.com

Michael deAgonia, Computerworld.com

Opinion: The top 10 standout Macs of the past 25 years - The iBook (1999)
...Most importantly, it was the first-ever mainstream consumer device that showcased wireless networking, something Jobs nonchalantly debuted during the 1999 Macworld Expo & Conference. Dubbed AirPort, Apple's implementation of Lucent's wireless technology quickly allowed wireless networking with a minimum of fuss.


Michael deAgonia, Computerworld.com

Andrew Gore, Macworld.com

Although Apple's consumer portable may be one of the company's most hotly anticipated products ever, the iBook's reality falls short of its media-generated hype.
It's not exactly a case of the emperor having no clothes--the iBook is a natty dresser--but what's under that striking attire leaves something to be desired in terms of size, ease of use, and flexibility.

Andrew Gore, Macworld.com

Gadjo C. Sevilla - canadianreviewer.com

The Apple Beat: 5 Technologies Apple pioneered that became tech standards  

……
WiFi - Apple called it AirPort and it debuted with the original clamshell iBooks and the AirPort Base Station which was a hotspot that resembled a spaceship. A magical technology, AirPort made it possible to untether from an Ethernet connection in order to get true wireless Internet. WiFi has evolved, it is a standard feature on most portable devices and everyone from Starbucks to McDonald’s offers free connections to entice users.

Gadjo C. Sevilla - canadianreviewer.com

Gefällt Ihnen meine Site?

Dann freue ich mich sehr über eine kleine Spende :)

Amount: